Maple Apple Buckwheat Breakfast Casserole [gluten-free, soy-free, vegan]

It’s getting chilly. And I don’t like it.

Well, I don’t mind it. But I love the hot, hot sun and I know that when the fall hits (although I do really love the fall), winter is around the corner.

Yes, I’m one of “those”.

But just as quickly as the weather shifts, so can your weekend breakfast. While fresh fruit salads and smoothies were the selections for the summertime, warm cozy breakfast casseroles win as our fall favourites as the weather cools off.

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And as luck would have it, here’s a good one for tomorrow… maple syrup required.

Maple-Apple Buckwheat Breakfast Casserole

This casserole highlights the simplicity of basic ingredients. A good quality maple syrup with seasonal apples brings out the natural flavour of the autumn apples.

2 cups Bob’s Red Mill Creamy Buckwheat (a pantry favourite–does it a devoted post?)
1 1/2 cups raisins
2 sweet tart apples, chopped into small pieces
1/2 cup pure maple syrup, plus more for serving (I like the dark stuff)
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon, plus a bit more
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon fine sea or Himalayan salt
2 cups unsweetened plain or vanilla nondairy milk (such as So Delicious or Almond Breeze)
1/2 cup toasted pecans or walnuts, coarsely chopped

Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).

In a 8-cup capacity casserole dish (an 8-inch square glass one will work great), layer a third of the buckwheat. Top with half of the raisins, half of the apples, and another 1/3 of the buckwheat. Follow with the rest of the apples, the maple syrup, then half of the cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. You can eyeball these amounts. It doesn’t have to be half exactly.

Pour half of the nondairy milk over the layers. Add the rest of the raisins, buckwheat, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Top with pecans, and sprinkle with additional cinnamon. Top with the remaining nondairy milk.

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes until the apples are tender. Let cool to room temperature, and serve with additional maple syrup.

Looking for other favourite warm breakfasts? Try my Pecan Pie Teff Porridge or Warm Quinoa with Apples, Raisins, and Pecans. With, conveniently, a bit of an ode to pecans.

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13 thoughts on “Maple Apple Buckwheat Breakfast Casserole [gluten-free, soy-free, vegan]

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  3. Sarah

    I made it this morning, and it was delicious! I do have a question though – the buckwheat on the top layers was still a bit firm with the buckwheat bits separated, even after adding more milk and cooking for about 45 minutes total. (Oven temperature is fine.) The very bottom layer was well cooked, soft, and a bit mushy. Any ideas? Or is this the way it’s supposed to be? It looked just like your photo. Thank you!

    Reply
    1. Laurie Post author

      Hi, Sarah! I am sorry for the delay and that I missed this.

      Did you use buckwheat or the creamy buckwheat cereal (from Bob’s Red Mill)?

      When I made it, it was similar to when you make, say, crumb bars where the bottom isn’t quite as crisp and the top stays really crunchy. Neither should have been overcooked or undercooked, but certainly a slightly different texture.

      Does that answer your question? I’m not sure if I’m being too vague! Just let me know, and I can help troubleshoot further.

      Reply
      1. Sarah

        Thanks for your reply Laurie! I used the BRM creamy buckwheat cereal. I’ve never made it as anything other than porridge – so the crunchy bits just seemed off. I added more almond milk to to the dish until everything was underneath the liquid, but it still just seemed to sink to the bottom – making the bottom soggier but leaving the top al-dente.

        Reply
        1. Laurie Post author

          I think now I want to make this again (this recipe is from 2008 in an old article I wrote). I do remember adding maple syrup to the top to serve.
          I think if I were to make it again, I would cover it, at least for a portion of the time, or stir it mid way. That said, then you don’t really need to layer it. Or, make it on the stovetop, but that also defeats the purpose.
          Gosh, it’s been so long since this recipe I’m trying to remember (I do remember I didn’t live in my current house because I can picture making it!). Alas, that isn’t helpful.

          I’m sorry I am not more help right now! But I do think the stirring midway might be a good idea.

          Reply

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